Depression and Sleep Apnea



The following link is to a 2003 Stanford report about the subject:
Link between depression, sleep apnea by Stanford
The following is an excerpt from the 2003 Stanford report (to review the entire article, click on the above link):
Stanford Report, November 5, 2003
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By MICHELLE L. BRANDT
People with depression are five times more likely to have a breathing-related sleep disorder than non-depressed people, according to a study at the School of Medicine. The study is the first to show a link between depression and sleep apnea along with its related disorders.Although it remains unclear how the conditions are linked, Maurice Ohayon, MD, PhD, said his study should encourage physicians to test depressed patients for this type of sleep disorder.

"Physicians who see people with depression shouldn’t stop at the first diagnosis, but instead look into the presence of a breathing-related sleep disorder," said Ohayon, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. His study appears in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

These disorders include such breathing anomalies as chronic, disruptive snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, a disorder in which people stop breathing for brief periods up to hundreds of times a night. Left untreated, the disorders can lead to hypertension, stroke and cognitive deterioration. They can also affect a person’s daily routine and disrupt his or her familial, social and professional life.



The following link is to an article by New Technology Publishing, Inc.:
Sleep apnea and depression